Eclectic Cabaret #11: Friday 29th March, 2019 (2am Blue, Andy Turner, So Far Untitled, The Hex Collective)

2am Blue

2am Blue are a local Oxfordshire trio who play mostly their own songs plus covers of songs that they love from the songbooks of artists in the Counting Crows and Bruce Springsteen genre.

They are known for the intimacy of their lyrics and and the musicality of the three guitars and the vocal harmonies.

the band 2am Blue

2am Blue

Andy Turner

Vocals, anglo-concertina, one-row melodeon: traditional English music sung and played with conviction.

Andy Turner fell in love with traditional music in the late seventies, and has been performing it ever since. He is a fine singer of traditional songs, and a leading exponent of the anglo-concertina.

Andy is a member of Oxfordshire group Magpie Lane and dance bands Geckoes, Chameleons and The Oxford NAGS. He performs solo, and in a duo with fiddle-player Mat Green. He has also worked with Chris Wood, the Oyster Band and the Mellstock Band.

Andy’s blog A Folk Song A Week ran for 5 years, during which time he posted some 280 songs (and he is still finding more to add, albeit not weekly) – mostly traditional, mostly English, but with the occasional number sourced from the likes of Billy Bragg, Richard Thompson, Elvis Costello and… George Formby.

Andy Turner

Andy Turner

So Far Untitled

So Far Untitled, as the name suggests, are a new collaboration brought together by a shared love of acoustic music. Playing crafted, melodic, original songs along with a smattering of classic covers.

So Far Untitled

So Far Untitled

The Hex Collective

Resurrecting lost folk songs from the Upper Thames. The Hex Collective are a guitar and cello duo who perform recently composed settings of words collected a century ago by the poet and folk song collector Alfred Williams. The Williams archive consists of over one thousand sets of words collected from villages in Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Oxfordshire. Williams was meticulous in recording the words to the songs he collected, but as a non-musician he was unable to notate any of the tunes. Although some melodies are known from other sources, the tunes to the majority of the sets of words in the archive have been lost. The words preserved in the archive provide a remarkable window on the lives and preoccupations of ordinary people in the still largely rural communities which were the source of Williams’ material. We have left the words largely untouched, but have made no attempt to make the music sound of the period, happily incorporating styles, such as reggae, unknown to the Edwardians, whilst retaining a broadly ‘folk’ approach. This allows us to present the Edwardian working class sensibility of the Williams archive with a rarely encountered immediacy and a 21st century edge. www.thehexproject.co.uk

The Hex Collective

The Hex Collective

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